My Favorite Etiquette Books

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I’ve had a few reader questions on which etiquette books are my favorite. In truth, I’m careful recommending etiquette books because, unfortunately, not all actually follow etiquette. Some of the newer ones are more of a “hey, let’s just do whatever we want, regardless of how we come across to others” feel. That is not remotely how I want to come across. However, I do have a couple I tend to lean on more than others, so I wanted to share those with you today. Emily Post’s Etiquette, 19th Edition: Manners for Today (Emily’s Post’s Etiquette) is a good standby. While it isn’t written by Emily Post any longer, as she is deceased, I still turn to it for table settings and other areas of etiquette that don’t fluctuate as much. However, I have found it isn’t as traditional as it once was. If you don’t want to spend $25 on a book, Emily Post’s Etiquette, 18th Edition (Emily Post’s Etiquette) is nearly $10 less. Very little has changed between the two.

Another etiquette expert I really enjoy is Amy Vanderbilt. This book, The Amy Vanderbilt Complete Book of Etiquette, 50th Anniversay Edition, is very user-friendly, and she gose into a little more of upscale situations than Emily Post does.

Regardless, I think you’ll find either book easy to understand and use! Thank you for reading!

Expired: Extra 25% Off Christmas Store – Lenox

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This deal isn’t *quite* as good as yesterday’s 30% sale, but it’s still a great discount, especially if you are looking to buy something for Thanksgiving or Christmas!

Extra 25% Off Christmas Store

In Defense of Trick-or-Treating

I hope everyone had a wonderful and safe Halloween! Also, Happy All Saints’ Day!

Our family enjoyed Halloween this year a lot. Garrett was Patrick Bateman from American Psycho {and not Dexter, as everyone thought he was 🙂 }, I was a black cat, Katherine was Minnie Mouse, and Grant was Leonardo (I think….blue ninja turtle).

For Katherine’s first Halloween, she was a black cat who was terrified of Minnie (me). We’ve come a long way, baby. My parents were both penguins, and they truly waddled due to the design of their costumes! It is the funniest thing ever.

One thing I noticed, though, was the rarity of porch lights in our area. We live in a very residential area, but most people (even those who decorated) didn’t participate in Trick-or-Treat. My theory? Truck-or-Treat. I understand the reasoning behind it. However, I think the “risk” associated with traditional trick-or-treating is grossly exaggerated due to social media. Social media usually exaggerates (or blatantly makes up) most things. I get it. Sensationalism sales. However, common sense should rule. Don’t trick-or-treat at shady places. Halloween, though, is about so much more than candy (to me, at least). I love the experience of going out. The excitement of the unknown.

As a kid growing up in the country, trick-or-treating consisted of going to family members’ homes. I longed for the experience my dad talked of from when he was a kid growing up in Irving.

Halloween also, in my opinion, can be a way we finally meet our neighbors. How many of us can name by name the people who live near us? What a great opportunity to meet someone new.

I am so thankful and proud to live where we do. I love having easy access to Brookshire’s and the library, as well as having friends who live a block from us.

When we first moved into our home, I was beyond excited about the mail slot on the door. It seemed to urban to me.

This post is not about bashing trunk-or-treats. I just think that traditional, old-fashioned trick-or-treating has a lot more to offer than meets the eye, and I would encourage anyone who is home next Halloween to consider flipping on your light and seeing who you might meet.

 

Lenox Halloween Sale!! Expired

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If you are looking for a great deal to start or add to your china collection, Lenox has a wonderful Halloween sale right now! Get 30% off of your purchase using this link: Extra 30% Off Halloween. Just use code HALLOWEEN.

My mom started collecting the Christmas plates in the pattern Holiday, which I love! It’s always so special to use these plates each Christmas.However, if you’re looking for Thanksgiving instead, they have that, too!

If, though, you want something more classic that will work for any holiday, y’all likely know my top pattern is Autumn.Right now the 5-piece plus BONUS set of Holiday china is only $99.95 (reg. $200). With the 30% off, it’s only $69.96! However, to get 4 place settings, right now it’s reduced to $224.95 from $492.00. With the 30% off, you pay only $157.47 or $39.37 for each place setting. That is a phenomenal price for bone china.

Happy Halloween!

Regional Dialect With My Daughter

Ok, how about a funny post for Halloween?!

We all know that dialect, like etiquette, is very regional. I was raised in East Texas by an East Texan who was raised by East Texans and so on. Seriously, our roots here are deep. However, my cute hubby made his way here from California when he was 11. In recent times he’s said “y’all” instead of “you guys.” Our daughter, though, says “y’all guys,” and it couldn’t crack me up more if she tried. Sweet girl is a prime example of mixing regional dialects.

This is what I find so fascinating about etiquette, as well. The mixing of it and the product of “new” etiquette. I’ve never known of a situation when even Emily Post herself simply decided on something new being etiquette. Rather, she would look at the current culture and evaluate whether or not something still applied in that area. People move in. People leave. Lots of external factors are at play when defining the culture of an area. To me, that’s what makes etiquette beautiful, as well.

Fun fact: It’s y’all, not ya’ll. Y’all is a contraction for you all, so the apostrophe goes where the letters are removed.