Election Etiquette

Today begins early voting for the party primaries. To me it seems like this day has been a long time coming. Each election cycle, candidates begin earlier and earlier with this campaign season, even beginning prior to officially turning in their paperwork. I expect this on the national level. It takes an excessive amount of time to campaign across an entire nation. I’m more surprised when I see this taking place on the local level. Additionally, some forums turn into mud slinging instead of informational sessions, which benefits no one.

I currently serve on our local city council. I’ve been personally attacked. I’ve witnessed personal attacks on others. It needs to stop. Therefore, today’s post is all about election etiquette.

I’m not sure when we first entertained the notion that everyone we encounter is dying to know our position. Let me be the first to say, they’re not. Some of the people I respect the absolute most rarely volunteer information regarding politics. That is not at all implying they’re uninformed or that they don’t care. They volunteer. They donate. They seek to become informed. When asked, they’ll happily state who they support and why. However, at the end of the day, the also understand that some people dig their own graves. By being overly forceful in supporting someone, it is often a turnoff of that candidate to others who may still be in the decision-making phase.

If you feel the need to strongly support a candidate, make sure that you don’t dominate the conversation with only your candidate’s information. Be willing to listen. Be willing to learn. You may very likely stick to the person you were initially supporting. However, you may also learn why someone else doesn’t. When we ask for change simply for the sake of change, you may get what you ask for. By listening, you’re opening up the conversation to dialogue as opposed to a monologue.

This next bit is important to state. Don’t wear candidate-specific items while voting. You will likely be asked to leave if you wear anything supporting a particular candidate to the polls. Make sure you leave the campaigning at home or at least outside of the specified area during early voting and on election day.

Most of all, seek to be an informed voter, and don’t feel pressured to vote a particular way. Listen not only to what people say but how they say it.

There are no perfect candidates. None. However, there are people you will find who are willing to listen and willing to prioritize items that are of utmost importance to you.

If you are a candidate during this election cycle, I wish you luck and peace. Also, know that there are many other ways of contributing aside from obtaining an elected position. If you do not win, please consider this.

Thank y’all for your time!

 

Spring 2018 Junior Cotillion Update

Hi, everyone! It’s been a few days since I’ve updated on Junior Cotillion and Cotillion. Junior Cotillion is now FULL. I am so thrilled to have this class at capacity in a matter of WEEKS. We’re still 5 1/2 weeks from starting, and your trust in me to teach your kiddos means more to me than I can say.

I still have around four spots for Cotillion. They are $75 each if you sign up and pay on or before February 28th. We begin on Tuesday, March 20th, and the class will be from 5:30-6:30, which follows Junior Cotillion. Both classes are at The Oaks Bed and Breakfast on Oak Ave. in Sulphur Springs, Texas. We meet for four weeks total, and at the end of the fourth class, we have a small presentations ceremony for the families to attend. It always means so much to the students when they get to show off their skills.

This year I’m also hosting Debutante, which I am beyond excited about. This is a dream of mine come true. Debutante is for young ladies in grades 9th through 12th. The cost is $100 per student. I try to keep my prices extremely affordable for families. I was blown away at the thousands it costs students in nearby cities. These skills will last them a lifetime, and I want to reinforce the fact that etiquette is for everyone. I appreciate your continued support so much.

Southern Grace Debutante Ball

I am thrilled to announce that the 2018 Southern Grace Debutante Ball will be held in Sulphur Springs, Texas on Saturday, April 21st at the beautiful The Venue at 219, which is located at 219 Main Street.

This event is for young ladies in grades 9th through 12th. The cost is $100 for those who register prior to March 15th. A full meal and live band, along with presentations will take place in the evening of the 21st of April.

Space will be limited due to the nature of the event.

Please email etiquettebyemily@gmail.com to reserve your space today!

Library Etiquette

My kids and I like to go to our local library on Thursday evenings. It’s open until 8pm on Thursdays, and, as a working mom, this is our little getaway each week.

I enjoyed just walking the aisles until something catches my eye. My daughter, 5, always migrates to the My Little Pony area, despite my attempts. I was always a Romona Quimby girl, to the point where I wrote “Ramona Quimby, age 8” at the top of all of my school papers when I was in the 3rd grade. I’m just grateful I went to a small school and my teacher, Mrs. Jaggers, knew who that was. My son likes The Berenstein Bears (it’s how I know he’s mine) and books about firemen.

Regardless of your interests, I’d bet you’ll be able to find them at your local library. I’ve surprisingly had a few emails informing me that people want to go to the library in their hometown, but they’re unsure of how to act. Here are a few pointers.

  • Unless you have a bottle-fed baby, don’t bring in food and water. Many libraries will have signs letting you know it’s not allowed, but it can easily harm books, which is the reasoning behind it.
  • Bring your kids! Most libraries have a kids’ section/area. Ours does, and it brings out their love for reading, which is essential.
  • Be timely in your returns. Aside from the minimal fine you’ll incur, it’s inconsiderate to other people who may have wanted to read that book.
  • Take phonecalls outside or to a designated area.
  • Don’t fold the pages! This one goes for any borrowed book. Don’t earmark the page to let you know where you are. Get a bookmark.
  • Limit computer use to an hour, if a time limit isn’t stated. Plenty of people use the library and all of its abundant resources, such as computers and/or wi-fi to do work. An hour is usually enough time to do what needs done while not preventing someone else getting their work done.

What other guidelines would you add to the above list?

As always, thank you for reading!