What Etiquette Is About

This quote needs very little follow up, but I always tell my students during cotillion that etiquette is not about acting superior to anyone else. Your manners will help you go further because of how you make people feel. Be kind to everyone. People remember how you make them feel. Everyone has value.


Library Etiquette

My kids and I like to go to our local library on Thursday evenings. It’s open until 8pm on Thursdays, and, as a working mom, this is our little getaway each week.

I enjoyed just walking the aisles until something catches my eye. My daughter, 5, always migrates to the My Little Pony area, despite my attempts. I was always a Romona Quimby girl, to the point where I wrote “Ramona Quimby, age 8” at the top of all of my school papers when I was in the 3rd grade. I’m just grateful I went to a small school and my teacher, Mrs. Jaggers, knew who that was. My son likes The Berenstein Bears (it’s how I know he’s mine) and books about firemen.

Regardless of your interests, I’d bet you’ll be able to find them at your local library. I’ve surprisingly had a few emails informing me that people want to go to the library in their hometown, but they’re unsure of how to act. Here are a few pointers.

  • Unless you have a bottle-fed baby, don’t bring in food and water. Many libraries will have signs letting you know it’s not allowed, but it can easily harm books, which is the reasoning behind it.
  • Bring your kids! Most libraries have a kids’ section/area. Ours does, and it brings out their love for reading, which is essential.
  • Be timely in your returns. Aside from the minimal fine you’ll incur, it’s inconsiderate to other people who may have wanted to read that book.
  • Take phonecalls outside or to a designated area.
  • Don’t fold the pages! This one goes for any borrowed book. Don’t earmark the page to let you know where you are. Get a bookmark.
  • Limit computer use to an hour, if a time limit isn’t stated. Plenty of people use the library and all of its abundant resources, such as computers and/or wi-fi to do work. An hour is usually enough time to do what needs done while not preventing someone else getting their work done.

What other guidelines would you add to the above list?

As always, thank you for reading!

Updating Our Home

We have a very traditional home. It was built in 1940, and I absolutely love the formality of it in some regards. It has a formal dining, which I consider a must. It also has a formal-style living room, which I love most days. However, we have young kids, so sometimes a formal life doesn’t work for us. I recently purchased cubical storage shelves for our sunroom, and I cannot wait to get them put together!

I wanted the kids to have a corner of the room that they can have their joint toys (legos, crayons, etc.) together. I’ll post a picture of the completed project! I wanted to make sure all of the readers knew about Target’s discount on kids’ home items through the 20th! Get up to 25% off!!

Up to 25% off kids’ home + an extra 20% off bed & bath with code HOMEREFRESH Sun-Thurs. Valid 1/14-1/20 

I have been asked more about discounts lately, and I am a firm believer in not paying more than you have to. That being said, I will always make an effort to only showcase ads that I truly believe you, the readers, will benefit from. As always, thank you for reading!

Regional Dialect With My Daughter

Ok, how about a funny post for Halloween?!

We all know that dialect, like etiquette, is very regional. I was raised in East Texas by an East Texan who was raised by East Texans and so on. Seriously, our roots here are deep. However, my cute hubby made his way here from California when he was 11. In recent times he’s said “y’all” instead of “you guys.” Our daughter, though, says “y’all guys,” and it couldn’t crack me up more if she tried. Sweet girl is a prime example of mixing regional dialects.

This is what I find so fascinating about etiquette, as well. The mixing of it and the product of “new” etiquette. I’ve never known of a situation when even Emily Post herself simply decided on something new being etiquette. Rather, she would look at the current culture and evaluate whether or not something still applied in that area. People move in. People leave. Lots of external factors are at play when defining the culture of an area. To me, that’s what makes etiquette beautiful, as well.

Fun fact: It’s y’all, not ya’ll. Y’all is a contraction for you all, so the apostrophe goes where the letters are removed.

When Efforts Pay Off

My mom, my kids and I just got back from the most amazing trip. We started out on Thursday morning before the sun was up, and we made it to New Orleans for our 1:30pm reservation at Commander’s Palace. I was ecstatic to get a lunch reservation for that day, as we wanted to keep the trip as schedule-free as possible. This, if you know me, is not my norm. I thrive on schedules, but, even though I did have moments of terror wondering what we were going to do, I loved the freedom of this trip.

I usually find that scheduling my time is more purposeful, and I’m able to get a lot more done. But this trip wasn’t about getting as much done as possible. It was about spending as much time together as possible. We were able to do a lot, which my Type A side appreciated. More than that, though, we were able to do a lot together. I loved sharing a meal at Commander’s Palace with my babies. Having my daugther choose to take a buggy ride as her choice of activity warmed my heart. We hit the highlights in every town, choosing the touristy route, and we spent most evenings playing for a couple of hours in the pool – which the kids absolutely loved.

In New Orleans we ate at Commander’s Palace and Cafe Du Monde, followed by a buggy ride; In Pass Christian we played in white sand and ate the best crab I’ve ever had. In Natchez we toured three homes and took pictures of the Mighty Mississippi; In Natchitiches we ate meat pies; In Jefferson we got Moody Dogs and Riverport barbecue and showed the kids where their daddy proposed to me many moons ago.

I wouldn’t have changed anything about it for the world. This trip also helped me realize something. I’m raising good humans. This will likely come across as though I’m tooting my own horn. My intent is not that at all. My intent is to encourage you to slow down in life long enough to see the good around you. I worry so much about making sure I’m doing everything in my power to ensure that my kids are smart, kind, outgoing, etc., etc., etc. I don’t slow down enough to always recognize that they are truly good people. They’re respectful. They thank others without being prompted. My daughter, at one point in a restaurant, even said, “I know what ladies do. They do this!” Then she promptly placed her napkin on the seat of her chair. This warmed my heart. She’s listening. They both are.

Most importantly, they pray for others who are hurting, such as those currently impacted by Harvey. They are good souls, and I’m thankful I get to be their momma and spend this time with them. I’m thankful for the reminder that they are enough. We all are.

Our prayers are with those who are impacted by Harvey.