Regional Dialect With My Daughter

Ok, how about a funny post for Halloween?!

We all know that dialect, like etiquette, is very regional. I was raised in East Texas by an East Texan who was raised by East Texans and so on. Seriously, our roots here are deep. However, my cute hubby made his way here from California when he was 11. In recent times he’s said “y’all” instead of “you guys.” Our daughter, though, says “y’all guys,” and it couldn’t crack me up more if she tried. Sweet girl is a prime example of mixing regional dialects.

This is what I find so fascinating about etiquette, as well. The mixing of it and the product of “new” etiquette. I’ve never known of a situation when even Emily Post herself simply decided on something new being etiquette. Rather, she would look at the current culture and evaluate whether or not something still applied in that area. People move in. People leave. Lots of external factors are at play when defining the culture of an area. To me, that’s what makes etiquette beautiful, as well.

Fun fact: It’s y’all, not ya’ll. Y’all is a contraction for you all, so the apostrophe goes where the letters are removed.

When Efforts Pay Off

My mom, my kids and I just got back from the most amazing trip. We started out on Thursday morning before the sun was up, and we made it to New Orleans for our 1:30pm reservation at Commander’s Palace. I was ecstatic to get a lunch reservation for that day, as we wanted to keep the trip as schedule-free as possible. This, if you know me, is not my norm. I thrive on schedules, but, even though I did have moments of terror wondering what we were going to do, I loved the freedom of this trip.

I usually find that scheduling my time is more purposeful, and I’m able to get a lot more done. But this trip wasn’t about getting as much done as possible. It was about spending as much time together as possible. We were able to do a lot, which my Type A side appreciated. More than that, though, we were able to do a lot together. I loved sharing a meal at Commander’s Palace with my babies. Having my daugther choose to take a buggy ride as her choice of activity warmed my heart. We hit the highlights in every town, choosing the touristy route, and we spent most evenings playing for a couple of hours in the pool – which the kids absolutely loved.

In New Orleans we ate at Commander’s Palace and Cafe Du Monde, followed by a buggy ride; In Pass Christian we played in white sand and ate the best crab I’ve ever had. In Natchez we toured three homes and took pictures of the Mighty Mississippi; In Natchitiches we ate meat pies; In Jefferson we got Moody Dogs and Riverport barbecue and showed the kids where their daddy proposed to me many moons ago.

I wouldn’t have changed anything about it for the world. This trip also helped me realize something. I’m raising good humans. This will likely come across as though I’m tooting my own horn. My intent is not that at all. My intent is to encourage you to slow down in life long enough to see the good around you. I worry so much about making sure I’m doing everything in my power to ensure that my kids are smart, kind, outgoing, etc., etc., etc. I don’t slow down enough to always recognize that they are truly good people. They’re respectful. They thank others without being prompted. My daughter, at one point in a restaurant, even said, “I know what ladies do. They do this!” Then she promptly placed her napkin on the seat of her chair. This warmed my heart. She’s listening. They both are.

Most importantly, they pray for others who are hurting, such as those currently impacted by Harvey. They are good souls, and I’m thankful I get to be their momma and spend this time with them. I’m thankful for the reminder that they are enough. We all are.

Our prayers are with those who are impacted by Harvey.