“Us” In A “Me” World

I feel the need to preface that “me” time is a great thing. While I am naturally more extroverted, my husband is not. It took several years for me to understand that the time alone he craved was nothing against me. It wasn’t that he didn’t enjoy time with me or that he didn’t like being around me. In fact, it had nothing to do with me at all! That revelation was wonderful for our marriage for my own precious “me” time.

How to Balance You and Me

“Me” time is fantastic. What is not fantastic, however, is valuing ourselves completely over everyone else. Like everything, the pendulum tends to swing too far at times. We’re gone from being martyrs to being selfish, and it’s glamorized in the media and magazines. So how can we balance having “me” time to rejunvenate us while remaining mindful that the world doesn’t revolved around us? My favorite tips are listed below!

  1. Keep Committments – Respect someone else’s time, as well as your own, to be dependable enough to keep the committments you’ve made. Etiquette, at its core, is about respect for others. Changing your mind because something better came up or because you’re suddenly longing for a Netflix night isn’t respecting others or respecting yourself. While emergencies are a clear reason why plans may change, changing on a whim isn’t acceptable.
  2. Schedule Alone Time – By purposefully scheduling time that is dedicated to you, you won’t feel deprived when your attention is directed elsewhere. It truly is important that we allow our own cup to be filled – just not at the expense of others.
  3. Know Your Limitations – When you are starting to feel worn down, don’t set yourself and others up for disappointment. Go ahead and say “no.” I’m not sure where the idea of declining an offer was thought to be against etiquette, but let me assure you – it’s not. It’s perfectly acceptable to turn an offer down. There are times you’ll need to. Check out my post on how to gracefully say no here.

As always, thank you for reading! I hope to hear some of your own suggestions in the comment section!

Spring 2018 Junior Cotillion Update

Hi, everyone! It’s been a few days since I’ve updated on Junior Cotillion and Cotillion. Junior Cotillion is now FULL. I am so thrilled to have this class at capacity in a matter of WEEKS. We’re still 5 1/2 weeks from starting, and your trust in me to teach your kiddos means more to me than I can say.

I still have around four spots for Cotillion. They are $75 each if you sign up and pay on or before February 28th. We begin on Tuesday, March 20th, and the class will be from 5:30-6:30, which follows Junior Cotillion. Both classes are at The Oaks Bed and Breakfast on Oak Ave. in Sulphur Springs, Texas. We meet for four weeks total, and at the end of the fourth class, we have a small presentations ceremony for the families to attend. It always means so much to the students when they get to show off their skills.

This year I’m also hosting Debutante, which I am beyond excited about. This is a dream of mine come true. Debutante is for young ladies in grades 9th through 12th. The cost is $100 per student. I try to keep my prices extremely affordable for families. I was blown away at the thousands it costs students in nearby cities. These skills will last them a lifetime, and I want to reinforce the fact that etiquette is for everyone. I appreciate your continued support so much.

What Etiquette Is About

This quote needs very little follow up, but I always tell my students during cotillion that etiquette is not about acting superior to anyone else. Your manners will help you go further because of how you make people feel. Be kind to everyone. People remember how you make them feel. Everyone has value.

 

Remembering Your Friends

A tradition of yesteryear is that of having a guest book at your house. I don’t mean for your wedding, though I certainly encourage said book for that occasion, as well. I mean having a guest book for the Halloween parties, the Easter egg hunts, the birthday parties, etc. that happen in your life.

I’m bringing this trend back for 2018 (even if it never fully catches one). I had the opportunity to take a history walk with a local historian, John Sellers. Now, John’s expertise isn’t limited to local history. He has spoken all over the USA and is well-known for his love and knowledge of history.

During this history walk, he mentioned that the home we were touring had a guest book in it where he found his mother’s name signed in it. Her maiden name. I mean, how neat is that?! I hope one day my kids are able to look back through various guests books and will recall the family traditions we had and the fun with friends we shared. You can get this beautiful Guest Book: Illustrated Nature Edition here.

{This post contains affiliate links, and we will be compensated for purchases made through the links.}

Mass Thank You Notes

Today’s post is brought to you by a reader’s comment from this post. I thought it was such an important topic, and I couldn’t believe I hadn’t already touched on it!

A common trend to escape actually writing thank you notes is for the recipient of a gift to send a group email or send a thank you note to everyone from work/church/etc. This, though, defeats the purpose of the thank you note, which is to express genuine thanks specifically to a person or family. The most people you should include on a thank you note would be everyone who resides in a single home. So, sending one to Uncle John, Aunt Sue and cousins Mark and Maggie is acceptable. Sending one to all 15 members of the IT department is not.

One minor exception would be to send a group email expressing thanks before following up with a hand-written note.

Ideally, a thank you note is physical (not electronic); it is to one person or family; it is handwritten.

The note doesn’t need to be lengthy. Let the giver know how the gift will be used and that it is appreciated. I always suggest adding in that you appreciate that they attended/missed them and one other personal thing in the note.

Thank you for the topic suggestion!