Library Etiquette

My kids and I like to go to our local library on Thursday evenings. It’s open until 8pm on Thursdays, and, as a working mom, this is our little getaway each week.

I enjoyed just walking the aisles until something catches my eye. My daughter, 5, always migrates to the My Little Pony area, despite my attempts. I was always a Romona Quimby girl, to the point where I wrote “Ramona Quimby, age 8” at the top of all of my school papers when I was in the 3rd grade. I’m just grateful I went to a small school and my teacher, Mrs. Jaggers, knew who that was. My son likes The Berenstein Bears (it’s how I know he’s mine) and books about firemen.

Regardless of your interests, I’d bet you’ll be able to find them at your local library. I’ve surprisingly had a few emails informing me that people want to go to the library in their hometown, but they’re unsure of how to act. Here are a few pointers.

  • Unless you have a bottle-fed baby, don’t bring in food and water. Many libraries will have signs letting you know it’s not allowed, but it can easily harm books, which is the reasoning behind it.
  • Bring your kids! Most libraries have a kids’ section/area. Ours does, and it brings out their love for reading, which is essential.
  • Be timely in your returns. Aside from the minimal fine you’ll incur, it’s inconsiderate to other people who may have wanted to read that book.
  • Take phonecalls outside or to a designated area.
  • Don’t fold the pages! This one goes for any borrowed book. Don’t earmark the page to let you know where you are. Get a bookmark.
  • Limit computer use to an hour, if a time limit isn’t stated. Plenty of people use the library and all of its abundant resources, such as computers and/or wi-fi to do work. An hour is usually enough time to do what needs done while not preventing someone else getting their work done.

What other guidelines would you add to the above list?

As always, thank you for reading!

Remembering Your Friends

A tradition of yesteryear is that of having a guest book at your house. I don’t mean for your wedding, though I certainly encourage said book for that occasion, as well. I mean having a guest book for the Halloween parties, the Easter egg hunts, the birthday parties, etc. that happen in your life.

I’m bringing this trend back for 2018 (even if it never fully catches one). I had the opportunity to take a history walk with a local historian, John Sellers. Now, John’s expertise isn’t limited to local history. He has spoken all over the USA and is well-known for his love and knowledge of history.

During this history walk, he mentioned that the home we were touring had a guest book in it where he found his mother’s name signed in it. Her maiden name. I mean, how neat is that?! I hope one day my kids are able to look back through various guests books and will recall the family traditions we had and the fun with friends we shared. You can get this beautiful Guest Book: Illustrated Nature Edition here.

{This post contains affiliate links, and we will be compensated for purchases made through the links.}

My Favorite Etiquette Books

{This post contains affiliate links, and we will be compensated for purchases made through the links.}

I’ve had a few reader questions on which etiquette books are my favorite. In truth, I’m careful recommending etiquette books because, unfortunately, not all actually follow etiquette. Some of the newer ones are more of a “hey, let’s just do whatever we want, regardless of how we come across to others” feel. That is not remotely how I want to come across. However, I do have a couple I tend to lean on more than others, so I wanted to share those with you today. Emily Post’s Etiquette, 19th Edition: Manners for Today (Emily’s Post’s Etiquette) is a good standby. While it isn’t written by Emily Post any longer, as she is deceased, I still turn to it for table settings and other areas of etiquette that don’t fluctuate as much. However, I have found it isn’t as traditional as it once was. If you don’t want to spend $25 on a book, Emily Post’s Etiquette, 18th Edition (Emily Post’s Etiquette) is nearly $10 less. Very little has changed between the two.

Another etiquette expert I really enjoy is Amy Vanderbilt. This book, The Amy Vanderbilt Complete Book of Etiquette, 50th Anniversay Edition, is very user-friendly, and she gose into a little more of upscale situations than Emily Post does.

Regardless, I think you’ll find either book easy to understand and use! Thank you for reading!

Thursday Thoughts

I remember as a freshman at Texas A&M University – Commerce, my English professor told us that one day all that will be left to remember you will be your writings. Now, I don’t fully agree with this, but it definitely struck a chord with me. I don’t actually remember a time I haven’t written. I have journals back from when I was in the second grade. I actually have the entry I made from the very first day I laid eyes on Garrett. Who knew then that we’d marry and have a family.

Books have always held a special place in my heart. I’ve fallen in love with characters’ stories and places. Truly, I miss Mitford and get homesick for Harmony and Hogwarts. It will likely come as no surprise that my love extends to etiquette books. I find it completely fascinating to see what’s changed (as well as what hasn’t) with etiquette. The fact that Emily Post is still popular today gives me hope, even if some of the Emily Post Institute’s advice is a little casual for my taste.

In short, I am excited to have an upcoming series on different etiquette books! I think you’ll find it as interesting as I do, and I hope you’ll learn something you’ve never known before in the process.

As always, thank you for reading!

Vacation Books

Sorry for the hiatus! I just returned from a trip to South Carolina with our dear friends, where I made sure to mind my etiquette manners. 😉 We stayed at an interval our friend’s parents have at the beach, and on the last night we were there, we made her mom a meal (her dad was not there). I would COMPLETELY recommend this in place of a hostess gift when staying with someone, particularly since in this case, they live at the house only eight weeks a year, with other families living there the remaining 44 weeks. Additionally, we flew, and our friend’s mom drove there, so space was limited. A thank you note will still follow our visit.

While there, we took in some of the historical side of the town (my favorite part of any place), as well as some fun shopping. One place, The Christmas Mouse, supplied all of our 2015 Christmas ornaments. We were about to decide to return to the beach house, when my friend made the call to go ahead and go insidbookse the general store. I’m SO glad we did. I bought four books for my kids and three for myself. 🙂 Being that this blog is still very new, I’m trying new things to bring interest to this site. All three books are etiquette and South-related. My first I hope to use for a few different posts. It is “What Southern Women Know (That Every Woman Should)” by Ronda Rich. I’m incredibly excited about this one. My other books are “Sue Ellen’s Girl Ain’t Fat, She Just Weighs Heavy” and “Suck In Your Stomach And Put Some Color On” both by Shellie Rushing Tomlinson. These two are for the feisty etiquette lovers!

All of the kids books were South and beach books. The Southern Mother Goose has several Texas poems, which my daughter already loves! Do you have any etiquette books you love?