Business E-mail Etiquette

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Whew. Y’all. It’s been one long day since last Thursday. In our small town, this past weekend was THE weekend – Hopkins County Stew Festival weekend. J I truly love this event. However, it’s also quite exhausting when you think of the preparation and clean up involved in feeding THOUSANDS of people within a two-hour block of time. We did it, though!

Now it’s back to blogging. We’re continuing the business etiquette blog series today with e-mail etiquette. As prevalent of a form of communication as e-mail is, I will go over general e-mail etiquette, too, for your convenience. I can be nice like that. J

Ok, general e-mail etiquette. Unless you’re 13, full words should be used. No “u” for “you.” Got it? The exception? In a business setting. I’m such the comedian. In all honesty, you absolutely may abbreviate words in an acceptable manner. For example, my real job (you know, the one that pays me) is at a bank. I could abbreviate BSA to stand for Bank Secrecy Act, as this would mean something to the receiver of an e-mail at my work. However, BSA can also stand for Boy Scouts of America. Unless the e-mail is specifically for business purposes AND the reader will understand said abbreviation, everything should be spelled out, at least initially.

Next, an e-mail should always include a signature of some kind. Type your name. Whatever is fine. Just don’t expect the receiver to automatically recognize your e-mail address and know it’s from you.

Also, if an e-mail is a group e-mail, reply all. It’s the equivalent to talking in person in a group.

Here’s a difference for you in casual e-mail vs. business e-mail. With business e-mail, there is no need to send a reply of “Thanks.” If a person wants to make sure you received it, they should request a read receipt. Business e-mail is for efficiency and not for your typical “fluff” etiquette. Kind of an oxymoron, given today’s topic, but it still applies.

With business, e-mail is considered a correct form of communication in all but just a few areas. A handwritten thank you still trumps an e-mails thank you, even in today’s world. Also, major news (a resignation, etc.) should not be delivered via e-mail. Your day-to-day correspondence, though, is totally fair game.

Finally, no e-mail should be forwarded without the original sender’s consent except in cases that are required by company policy to be sent to a supervisor.

I’d love to answer any additional business e-mail etiquette questions you may have! Thank you for reading!

Business Interview Etiquette – Both Sides

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Thank you for reading the first post regarding business etiquette! I am unsure how many parts for this series I will do, so I’m not numbering them. However, please let me know if there’s something you feel I haven’t adequately covered!

We briefly touched on introductions yesterday. Today we’ll continue to the interview process. When you are being interviewed, you should take your cues from the person(s) interviewing you, even if you are currently employed at the business. Often times during an internal interview for a new position, a person becomes too relaxed and comfortable, failing to make a good business impression. Remember you want them to consider you for the job you want, not the job you have.

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Likewise, it is important to dress your best for an interview. Keep in mind this should be appropriate for the job. However, even for manual labor jobs, dressing up is never a bad thing. Now, there will be the rogue company who wants to appeal to millennials (yes, I know I am one…) with their “jeans every single day” attire. However, as much as we may want to dismiss the notion, you are instantly judged on your appearance. Is it fair? Not necessarily, but what is?

This is not the time to try out new fashion trends you aren’t comfortable with. Along those lines, your attire should fit, and you should be comfortable in it so you aren’t distracted from the interview itself.

The person interviewing should extend their hand first. If they don’t, after a few moments, it is ok for the person being interviewed to initiate this.

Eye contact is appropriate, but don’t stare them down. This goes for both sides of the interview.

If you are applying for a position, prepare for your interview. Have the name of the person(s) who will interview you. Know a few basic facts about the company and/or the position. You will be more convincing on why you’re the right person for the job.

Do not interrupt the other person! Again, both sides.

At the end of the interview, shake hands and thank the person for his/her time.

After an interview, send a follow up e-mail or handwritten letter thanking them for their time and the opportunity to interview. As much as this is part of etiquette, it’s also just a good business tip for leaving a good impression. You may attach your contact information to this correspondence so they may more easily reach out to you. However, that is sufficient. It can appear to be a bribe if you send anything more (candies, etc.).

Regardless of the decision made, do not take it personally, unless there was true illegal discrimination against you.

Thank you for reading! Check back tomorrow for a briefing on e-mail etiquette. In the coming days, we’ll also talk about social media etiquette in regards to business! J

I’d love to hear your thoughts!