In Defense of Trick-or-Treating

I hope everyone had a wonderful and safe Halloween! Also, Happy All Saints’ Day!

Our family enjoyed Halloween this year a lot. Garrett was Patrick Bateman from American Psycho {and not Dexter, as everyone thought he was 🙂 }, I was a black cat, Katherine was Minnie Mouse, and Grant was Leonardo (I think….blue ninja turtle).

For Katherine’s first Halloween, she was a black cat who was terrified of Minnie (me). We’ve come a long way, baby. My parents were both penguins, and they truly waddled due to the design of their costumes! It is the funniest thing ever.

One thing I noticed, though, was the rarity of porch lights in our area. We live in a very residential area, but most people (even those who decorated) didn’t participate in Trick-or-Treat. My theory? Truck-or-Treat. I understand the reasoning behind it. However, I think the “risk” associated with traditional trick-or-treating is grossly exaggerated due to social media. Social media usually exaggerates (or blatantly makes up) most things. I get it. Sensationalism sales. However, common sense should rule. Don’t trick-or-treat at shady places. Halloween, though, is about so much more than candy (to me, at least). I love the experience of going out. The excitement of the unknown.

As a kid growing up in the country, trick-or-treating consisted of going to family members’ homes. I longed for the experience my dad talked of from when he was a kid growing up in Irving.

Halloween also, in my opinion, can be a way we finally meet our neighbors. How many of us can name by name the people who live near us? What a great opportunity to meet someone new.

I am so thankful and proud to live where we do. I love having easy access to Brookshire’s and the library, as well as having friends who live a block from us.

When we first moved into our home, I was beyond excited about the mail slot on the door. It seemed to urban to me.

This post is not about bashing trunk-or-treats. I just think that traditional, old-fashioned trick-or-treating has a lot more to offer than meets the eye, and I would encourage anyone who is home next Halloween to consider flipping on your light and seeing who you might meet.

 

Traveling and Culture

Hi, everyone! It’s been a while since I’ve had an opportunity to post. For 9 days my husband, kids and I were out of cell phone range, which, to be 100% honest, was actually wonderful!

“At Mother Goose’s (Mary Goose) grave in Boston”

We had the opporunity to go to New Hampshire, Boston, Cape Cod (the Mayflower Beach in Dennis was beautiful!), Plymouth, Martha’s Vineyard, Maine (another favorite), and my husband went and ran the original Spartan race in Vermont. Overall, our trip could not have been better! We spent time with family who live in New Hampshire and disconnected from the outside world for a while.

However, this trip and its lack of cell phone signal did not give me any opportunities to update, so I apologize for my absence.

I was very intrigued by some of the regional differences in New England and the South. My aunt told me that the people are very nice in New England (and they are), but they’re not as initially warm. There’s definitely a sense of formality in how they act. That same formality, though, does not extend to dress, and I was mildly surprised that most did not seem to dress up as they do in the South. In fact, at the church we visited, I was the only female (aside from my daughter) in a dress. Y’all know my tendencies to wear dresses, though.

“At a lighthouse in Maine – one of our favorite stops!”

Additionally, people did not seem to initiate conversations, but they were happy to talk once they began. We dropped off my cousin and her two friends at a middle school dance, and the parents lingered briefly, but it definitely wasn’t like some of the local dances here where the outside of the dance seems to be a social gathering for the parents.

At Martha’s Vineyard, I was doubly shocked that people didn’t seem to ever stop for pedetrians who were trying to cross in the cross walk during their turn, but they seemed to have no problem wearing white after Labor Day. A lady I met at the above mentioned dance (from Florida) said she has still not gotten accustomed to the white after Labor Day she saw there.

However, even with the differences from “normal” life, I truly loved and appreciated our time there. Culture is so unique and diverse, and it should be. Out of all the places we visited, Martha’s Vineyard was actually my least favorite. Maine and the North End of Boston were my top two. When I visit, I don’t want to feel like a tourist; I want to be submerged into the culture.

“View from Gay Head Lighthouse in Matha’s Vineyard”

Martha’s Vineyard is undeniably beautiful. However, while we were there, other than the scenery, I couldn’t find anything about it that really made it unique. The shops were very similar to one another. Ice cream has to be the top trade there.

“Sharing ice cream on vacation”

On the other hand, in the North End, I walked into a cafe to order a cappuccino, and I had to find a waitress that spoke English. Fresh pasta was in the windows of a couple of the markets. There were fish markets, produce markets, meat markets, etc. I could have stayed there for days. By the end of the day we stayed there, I felt like I truly experienced the North End – I can only imagine how much more engrossed I would have been given more time.

I am so thankful my family and I had this opportunity and this time together. Getting to experience life in a different area is something I will never taked for granted. Is there a culture you truly enjoy experiencing other than your own? I’d love to hear!