How To Raise Polite Kids

Let me start off by saying that by no means are my kids close to perfect. They’re 3 and 5. They love mud puddles (including drinking from them for my son….ick), they kiss the dog, and we finally figured out why we had so many spoons missing after they learned to take their plate to the kitchen. They were simply throwing them away. Sigh.

However, overall I feel my job as Mom is to raise polite adults. This starts with them learning to be polite kids. Today I have a few pointers to share with you, and I hope you find them encouraging.

  1. Be a polite adult. I don’t advocate treating kids like adults, but I do advocate being polite to everyone, including children. It’s like the old saying goes – Monkey see, monkey do. When speaking with my kids (or any child, for that matter), don’t interrupt them or cut them off unless it’s necessary. There most definitely will be times it’s necessary. However, the more I let my kids talk to me like this, the more they tell me. It may seem unimportant to us, but to them, they’re learning so much, and it’s exciting. I also make sure to treat other adults with respect all of the time, including in my car at a four-way stop that apparently is difficult for people to understand. Ahem. They listen always. Be polite.
  2. Use Please and Thank You regularly. This definitely ties in with number one, but one of my proudest mom moments was when my daughter didn’t need any prompting to say thank you to someone who had complimented her. I just love that she knew what to do. My son is finally at this point, too, for the most part.
  3. Have them write thank you notes. If you’ve read my blog for any length of time, you know that I have to write thank you notes pretty much immediately. Or they get put off. And put off. And out off. It’s my etiquette flaw. I want this to be second nature for my kids, so I make sure they understand why we write these notes, how we write them, etc. My daughter can write simple ones, but for my son, I have him draw a picture or write his name to include him in the process.
  4. Have family meals. There is no better time to teach dinner etiquette than in the safety and comfort of your own home. Basic utensil use, napkin use, and chewing with your mouth closed are all skills honed by repetitive use. Plus, you get invaluable time together.

Do you have something you think should be added to the list? Please leave it in the comment section for everyone else to have a chance to read, too! J Thank you for reading.

 

Political Politeness, Part 1

Political discussions can quickly become political arguments. Let’s face it. It’s rare we ever change someone’s political opinion to that of our own. We all have areas within politics that are near and dear to our hearts. Therefore, what may be important to us may not be important to someone else, rendering your political argument a moot point.

Since my trips to both Austin and D.C., I’ve promised you a political etiquette mini-series, and I’m here to deliver. I’d like to start with the basics. Unless you are at a political forum or arena (appropriate word, given some of the outcomes I’ve witnessed), the best course of action is to truly steer clear of political debates. This is not to say you can’t have conversations of depth. It is to imply that it’s rare for a political discussion to have a change of someone’s thoughts.

If you are actually at a political forum, keep the discussion relevant to the topic at hand. Allow the candidate the opportunity to complete a thought before you respond. With any other attendee at the forum, remember they are not the candidate, regardless of how supportive they may seem.

Taboo topics are anything personally related. It does not matter if the candidate’s son has 50 tattoos. It does not matter if his or her daughter is obese. What matters, in this capacity, is the candidate’s ability to serve. There’s no sense in wasting an opportunity bashing a candidate personally, when you could use the time to learn more about his or her political beliefs.

In person, the term congressman is usually in reference to someone in the House of Representatives at the national level, such as Congressman Smith. It may, however, be used for the members of Senate, as well. Erroneously, “senator” is sometimes used. The term senator may not be used for someone in the House of Representatives.

In the end, we are all more than our political affiliation or lack thereof, and it’s important we keep this in mind.