Hello, Spring!

I’ve had a few readers request for me to talk about my family’s life, which I’m thrilled to get to do. I think my famils is the foundation for who I am and why etiquette and traditions are so important to me. I also believe that, as a mother, I understand the struggles other parents share with trying to teach etiquette to their kids. It isn’t all sunshine and roses, but it’s also truly worth the effort.

Pear blossoms

I absolutely love spring. Actually, I love all seasons, as there is just so many possibilities that each season holds. I thrive on anticipation. Spring brings warm days, picnics, new growth, promises and so many more “good” things. I struggle, though, with sharing any difficulties I experience because I feel as though I never want to be a disappointment to my readers. However, I’ve resolved to be completely authentically real. So, each month I plan to share areas of etiquette I’ve either struggled to understand or implement. I hope this will give you hope.

I’ve mentioned in the past I have a *slight* Pottery Barn addiction. I get frustrated with how the world seems to glorify failure. I’ve read a lot of good articles recently on it, as I’ve attempted to understand why it’s become so popular lately. In my opinion, it goes beyond the idea of us all being human and making mistakes. I don’t believe that mistakes doom us to simply giving up trying. My goal in sharing my struggles is for us to share ideas on how to help each other.

Outdoor eating is one of my favorite things about warmer weather!

In no way do I believe that life should look like a Pottery Barn magazine all of the time. I also disagree with the idea that we should all give up trying. So, here’s to sharing what makes us real while continuing to try our best. There will be a lot of grace along the way.

Authentically Real

Y’all may or may not recall this post where I talk about my love of Pottery Barn (as well as why I have stepped back from it). Clearly Pottery Barn isn’t the problem. The products are designs I truly love. The problem was my need for it and the “perfect life” it represented.

I get asked all too often if we dress in Sunday best for dinner at our house.

No, we don’t. Knowing which fork to use doesn’t make you a good person. Feeding others with what you have, does.

My kids love the dirt and mud. They ride in their battery-powered Jeep giggling and yelling. They trapse mud through the house in an effort to get to the bathtub. Our house is pier and beam and, thus, moves. My stomach is no where near where I want it to be. Neither are my hips. Neither are the bags under my eyes.

I forget to call or text friends back. I get overwhelmed. We are so very real and so very far from perfection. However, I walk the line where I refuse to glorify failure and false expectations of being perfect. I refuse to glorify not doing our best. I will never accept any person in my family not trying his or her best self. And still…perfection will never be obtained.

This has been hard for me to accept and to understand in today’s society where success is measured in the amount of time you spend simply being busy. Even when we’re with our family, we’re often not really there. This is what I will not accept for myself. While I will never be THE best, I can be my best. And that’s enough.

So, I hope you will find this blog authentically real and motivating. I never want anyone to feel defeated by different etiquette rules. As always, thank you for reading and for your support. 🙂