Etiquette In a World That Glorifies Mediocrity

I’ve hesitated on how/if to write this post. However, after numerous emails from people who are mainly put out with friends and family who seem to promote tardiness and flaunt disrespect, I’ve decided it’s time to go ahead and lay it all out there.

Today’s world seems to glorify mediocrity.

You’ve seen the memes that say, “I respect parents who have it all together. But parents who stumble in to drop their kids off at school, looking like they just got attacked by a flock of angry birds? Those are my people.” This post is not intended to shame anyone who is doing their best in the season they’re in. I’ve been there. I’ll soon be there again after baby #3’s arrival. (Side note….we need to pick a name…) There are seasons, sometimes ones that last for years, where we have to give ourselves lots and lots of grace. Perfection isn’t attainable all of the time. Nor is it wrong to show our realness and our flaws. But by promoting that it’s not only acceptable but desirable to be someone who isn’t considerate of other people’s time by being late consistently – where does this come from? Why do we accept the status quo and try play up the “cuteness” factor of not having it all together?

After truly thinking and praying on this subject, I think at the core, the real issue is that we have a culture who glorifies busyness. If you seem like you have it all together, you must not be doing enough. You must not be a parent who lets their kids be involved or you would be late to everything. You must be a subpar employee or you wouldn’t be able to leave to make your kid’s soccer practice on time. It’s almost as if someone decided that if they can’t be perfect all of the time, they’re going to do a 180 and be imperfect all of the time. We incorrectly associate busyness as progress. It is not.

If you bring Brookshire’s chicken to a potluck at church instead of fixing homemade, that is wonderful. If you deliberately show up 20 minutes late with wet hair and nothing in hand, I do think it may be time to step back and reexamine your priorities. We cannot do it all; why, though, are we allowing this to keep us from doing anything?

I’ve said it over and over, but it bears saying again. Etiquette is about respect of others and respect for ourselves. We should each respect our self enough to choose to be our best self – it will be unique for each person. We know, though, deep down, if we’re doing enough to just get by or if we’re choosing to prioritize ourselves and others. It is a subtle difference, but it’s enough to get recognized by others. Trust me when I say that people are drawn in by and attracted to this trait. It’s 100% okay to not be the best. Why, though, would you not want to be your best you?

 

 

Southern Cooking With A Cast Iron Skillet

One of my favorite kitchen tools is the classic cast iron skillet. My mom and granny both cooked in one religiously. My granny’s cornbread skillet has to be the smoothest and best seasoned skillet I know. My mom has a rare talent for finding old, warped skillets and making them like new again with her seasoning skills.

Seasoning in this instance is not like salt and pepper, for those who don’t know. Seasoning refers to a technique for prepping a cast iron skillet. If you treat a cast iron skillet correctly, you won’t need to season regularly.

Soap should never be used on cast iron skillets.

Trust me on this. The skillet is very porous, so the soap residue will remain, which will seep out into your food. My home economics teacher in high school taught us that the very best way to clean a cast iron skillet is with hot water. One you’ve cleaned it, heat it on the stove to ensure that every droplet of water is removed.

If you find an old skillet (those are my favorite kind), the rare exception to soap maaay be right before you season it. This is incredibly debated, though. If you choose to use soap, make sure you use a heavy duty scrubber with lots of hot water after you do so.

After you dry it, rub a thin layer of vegetable oil all over the interior of the pan. I mean thin. You don’t want build up on your pan. Finally, place your skillet upside down in a 400-degree oven for an hour.

Lard was originally used in place of oil. This is still commonly used by people who regularly use their skillet. Animal fat, though, can go rancid if you don’t use your skillet often, so this will need to be a personal preference.

Once your skillet is seasoned, you can just maintain it. To maintain, sfter you wash your skillet with hot water, add a very, very minute amount of oil to your pan. I also like to place paper towels in between skillets.

While old skillets are my favorite, Lodge is a great brand, so I wanted to at least give y’all a link if y’all are interested in looking into these skillets more. Click on picture to learn more!

If you cook with cast iron, I’d love to hear your thoughts on it!

Here’s a super, super easy two-ingredient “recipe” for you to try!

Combine an 8-oz brick of cream cheese with a can of Hormel chili (no beans for us Texans). Heat on top of top to melt cheese. Place in a 350-degree oven for 20 minutes. Serve with Fritos or tortilla chips. Enjoy!