Mass Thank You Notes

Today’s post is brought to you by a reader’s comment from this post. I thought it was such an important topic, and I couldn’t believe I hadn’t already touched on it!

A common trend to escape actually writing thank you notes is for the recipient of a gift to send a group email or send a thank you note to everyone from work/church/etc. This, though, defeats the purpose of the thank you note, which is to express genuine thanks specifically to a person or family. The most people you should include on a thank you note would be everyone who resides in a single home. So, sending one to Uncle John, Aunt Sue and cousins Mark and Maggie is acceptable. Sending one to all 15 members of the IT department is not.

One minor exception would be to send a group email expressing thanks before following up with a hand-written note.

Ideally, a thank you note is physical (not electronic); it is to one person or family; it is handwritten.

The note doesn’t need to be lengthy. Let the giver know how the gift will be used and that it is appreciated. I always suggest adding in that you appreciate that they attended/missed them and one other personal thing in the note.

Thank you for the topic suggestion!

Announcment: Invitations Coming Soon

Y’all. My son is turning four years old. I can barely believe it. As I was looking through Etsy to find an invitation I liked, I kept stumbling across absolutely beautiful bridal and baby shower invitations. However, I noticed a common theme. The registry was written on each and every one of them. I do know that it’s simple and easy. However, I also know that it can look cheap and as though that’s the only reason you’re having a shower.

So, instead of lamenting this problem forever, I decided to take matters into my own hands! Coming soon will be etiquette-approved invitations for all occasions! Bridal, baby, graduation, birthday…you name it! Also, in case you’re wondering, I will have a way to let people know that you are registered without it being the primary focus of the invitation. I’m so excited to bring this to you!

As always, thank you for reading!

 

It’s Wedding Season!

It’s wedding season! Check out my top picks from Amazon. My kitchen aid mixer is something I use nearly daily, so, even though it’s pricy, we’ve gotten our money’s worth with it.


This post contains affiliate links, and I will earn compensation for any purchase you make after clicking these links.

Married Monograms!

In honor of #weddingwednesday, I wanted to touch base on married monograms. It’s easy to want to jump the gun and present your married monogram sooner than etiquette dictates; however, it really is best to save it for your wedding day – speaking of monograms, of course. Ahem.

Anytime before “I now pronounce you man and wife” is uttered, you should use your maiden monogram. Once those magic words are said, feel free to flaunt your married monogram! Just a few notes: the wife’s initial is first on about 99.999999999999% of things. In the rare case you are monogramming your beer mugs or anything similar, his initial would do first. Here are a couple of ways to use your married monogram.

married-monogram1

Now, what about if there’s a title, as in the case of stamps? Yes, I know what you’re thinking: “What about the rule that you never separate a man from his name?” Well, in this case, the “Mr. and Mrs.” trumps this rule. Thus, if there is a title, his name would go first.

So, to break it down: John Brown and Anna Brown.

You could write Mr. and Mrs. John Brown or Anna and John Brown. Their monogram would be ABJ, with the “B” larger than the other letters.

I’d love to know your thoughts! Do you monogram anything? Why or why not?

Save-the-Dates vs. Invitations

There is a little confusion, it seems, on when to send a wedding invitation. Per etiquette, a wedding invitation is sent around eight weeks prior to the wedding, with the RSVP due back two to three weeks before the big day. In our busy world, this may be mind-boggling, but it truly is correct. Enter, the save-the-date card. This is NOT a formal invitation, so please be mindful to send anyone a follow up formal invitation if you send them a save-the-date. These, however, may be sent as soon as the date is set. It is a good middle ground on etiquette vs. necessity. It is, however, a fairly new tradition and once considered quite gaudy and presumptuous. Now, though, it is honestly considered thoughtful – just goes to show how much things can change in a short period of time!

The save-the-date may be informal and include a wedding website. Like it’s counterpart, it still should NOT directly refer to a registry. It can be postcard format, a magnet, a cute card, etc. There are countless options to announce your wedding date, so feel free to show your creativity!

invitation

For an invitation, certain aspects should be included: the people who are getting hitched, the ones actually inviting (traditionally, the bride’s family), the date, the time, the location. For a VERY informal wedding, the RSVP may be included at the bottom. For your typical wedding, though, you should include an RSVP card with the RSVP by date on the RSVP card. Also, if you are requesting that guests mail their RSVP in to you, please pre-stamp the envelope. Yes, it’s a small additional cost, but it’s just tacky to not. Again, have a wedding you can afford.

Monogramming Madness: Your married monogram should NOT be displayed or used until after the wedding (it may actually be used at the VERY end of the wedding, once you are pronounced husband and wife). The best time to display is at the reception. Please keep this in mind for save-the-dates and invitations!

Any questions? Just ask! I’ll be happy to answer!